Firms work on additive manufacturing for aerospace parts

By Frank Antosiewicz
Correspondent

Published: August 1, 2012 6:00 am ET

The printing on this ice scraper was done at the University of Dayton Research Institute. (UDRI photo)

Related to this story

Topics Materials, Molds/Tooling, Design

DAYTON, OHIO (Aug. 1, 1:15 p.m. ET) — The University of Dayton Research Institute plans to use a $3 million grant from the Ohio Third Frontier Fund to develop a state supply chain for the printing and production of three-dimensional plastic engine components for the airplane industry.

“It is all about economic development in Ohio. We had to develop jobs in Ohio,” said Brian Rice, head of the UDRI’s Multi-Scale Composites and Polymers Division, in a telephone interview.

The research institute is working to develop a nanomaterial to reinforce the polymer feedstock that will increase strength and stiffness and also electrical conductivity.

It is working in collaboration with PolyOne Corp. and Rapid Prototype Plus Manufacturing Inc., both of Avon Lake, Ohio. PolyOne will scale up production of the polymer feedstock needed for mass manufacturing, while RP+M will handle the manufacturing.

Stratasys Inc. of Eden Prairie, Minn., is supporting by helping integrate the new materials into their additive manufacturing systems.

The partners are working to supply GE Aviation, which has its headquarters in Evendale, Ohio. The company has six major facilities as well as more 9,000 employees in the Dayton area. There are also many other companies that will be able to use the parts as well.

Rice said that additive manufacturing has evolved as an emerging technology in the last five years and is expecting to grow rapidly in the coming years.

Rice said that UDRI has been researching ways to produce airplane parts and decided on the Stratasys system of using the fused deposition modeling system to produce thermoplastic parts. Rice said that the system reduces waste because it uses only as much material needed for the model. It also eliminates the need for bolts, screws and welding.

He said that using the printer to produce parts with newer materials can add up to savings.

“Lighter parts mean greater fuel efficiency in vehicles and aircraft that use them. Another advantage is the cost savings that comes from a part-as-needed process, because you don’t need to ship parts or find a place to warehouse them,” said Jeff DeGrange, vice president of Stratasys, in a statement.

Rice said that UDRI can start working on the project with a Stratasys printer used by the University of Dayton Engineering Department. Part of the grant will allow the purchase of a second printer.

He also said the project will develop more jobs for Ohio, especially in the manufacturing area. It’s estimated that the grant could lead to as many as 85 new jobs in the next five years. It will also give Dayton students to work with cutting edge technology.

The UDRI was founded in 1956 to do research on behalf of the U.S. Air Force and has a strong focus on producing new materials for use in the aircraft industry.


Comments

Firms work on additive manufacturing for aerospace parts

By Frank Antosiewicz
Correspondent

Published: August 1, 2012 6:00 am ET

Post Your Comments


Back to story


More stories

Image

New Hexcel plant will supply carbon fiber for Airbus A350 XWB

September 30, 2014 2:43 pm ET

Hexcel Corp. is investing $250 million on a new carbon fiber plant in France, with part of the production going into the future Airbus SAS A350 XWB.    More

Image

Extreme Tool uses remote Michigan location to attract younger workers

September 30, 2014 3:47 pm ET

“I'm not saying there's anything wrong with being an old guy like me. But I do believe in the power of youth and reinvesting in training. The...    More

Image

LyondellBasell CEO Gallogly to retire

September 30, 2014 3:00 pm ET

James Gallogly, CEO of Houston-based polyolefins producer LyondellBasell Industries NV, on Sept. 29 announced plans to retire in 2015.    More

Image

Asahi Kasei breaks ground on Alabama compounding plant

September 29, 2014 5:39 pm ET

Asahi Kasei Plastics North America will be able to solve two problems at once with a new compounding plant in Athens, Ala.    More

Image

DuPont shifting Teflon production in China

September 29, 2014 2:35 pm ET

DuPont Co. will spend more than $15 million to improve its fluoropolymer product offerings in China.    More

Market Reports

Plastics in Mexico - State of the Industry Report

This report analyzes the $20 million dollar plastics industry in Mexico including sales of machinery & equipment, resins and finished products.

Our industry analysis highlights macro industry trends and micro trends faced by companies that do business in Mexico. The report also provides key industry statistics and forecasts to anticipate future industry expansion.

Learn more

Plastics Caps & Closures Market Report

The annual recap of top trends and future outlook for the plastics caps & closures market features interviews with industry thought leaders and Bill Wood’s economic forecast of trends in growing end markets. You will also gain insight on trends in caps design, materials, machinery, molds & tooling and reviews of mergers & acquisitions.

Learn more

Injection Molders Market Report & Ranking 2014

This special package contains our 132-page 2014 Market Report on the Injection Molding segment and our exclusive 2014 RANKINGS database of 500+ Injection Molders for a discounted package price.

Learn more

Upcoming Plastics News Events

January 14, 2015 - January 14, 2015Plastics in Automotive

February 4, 2015 - February 6, 2015Plastics News Executive Forum 2015

June 2, 2015 - June 3, 2015Plastics Financial Summit - Chicago 2015

September 16, 2015 - September 18, 2015Plastics Caps & Closures - September 2015

More Events