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European project developing fire-retardant additives using nanotechnology

By: Michael Lauzon

July 17, 2013

A collaborative project in Europe is developing nanotechnology-based fire retardant additives it hopes to replace conventional non-halogenated additives at much lower addition levels.

Phoenix has been a 4-year project composed of 15 partners from eight European countries and coordinated by Aimplas in Valencia, Spain. A key goal is to eliminate halogenated fire retardants with materials that can be added at levels of about 15 percent to plastics — half or less than typical conventional non-halogenated additives now used. Phoenix argues that high levels of non-halogenated types negatively affect a polymer's physical properties.

Phoenix is working on nanoparticle additives alone or in conjunction with each other. It aims to make nanoparticles from carbon-based graphene, modified lignins derived from wood, nanohydroxides and encapsulated phosphorus-based retardants in hollow particles. In addition to better sustainability through lower additive levels, Phoenix said added benefits will include work safety, consumer safety and low environmental impact.

Tel. 34-96-136-6040, email phoenix@aimplas.es.