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Zinc tapped in new antibacterial

By: Michael Lauzon

October 9, 2013

A Dutch firm has found a way to bind zinc to polymers to give them antibacterial properties.

Parx Plastics of Rotterdam, Netherlands, said the technology is a safe alternative to use of nano-silver and triclosan, a polychlorophenoxy phenol. Parx claims its new antibacterial reaches up to 99 percent effectiveness after 24 hours based on ISO 22196 test guidelines.

“The antibacterial property can be included in products that to date could not incorporate this functionality because of guidelines, limitations or compromised characteristics,” notes Parx cofounder Michael van der Jagt.

Treated polymers cause bacteria to shrivel and die and human cells are not affected, according to Parx. Zinc is present in the environment in trace quantities and it doesn’t leach from Parx’s treated polymers. Polymers containing the technology are suited to food contact and other sensitive applications, Parx argues. The antibacterial action lasts the lifetime of the component and is unaffected by light or temperature. An Eastman copolyester treated with the agent is being targeted at infant care products.

Parx supplies treated polymer concentrates called Saniconcentrate for mixing into resin.

Tel. 31-10-340-0095, email press@parxplastics.com.