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European agency says high molecular weight phthalates are safe in toys

By: PRW

January 31, 2014

The European Commission has concluded that the use of high molecular weight phthalates in certain toys and childcare products poses no risk to infants. The findings, which also include adult sex toys, are in line with the conclusions presented last August by the European Chemicals Agency (ECHA).

Based on ECHA’s assessment, the Commission has concluded that “no unacceptable risk has been characterised for the uses of DINP and DIDP in articles other than toys and childcare articles which can be placed in the mouth”. The Commission further concluded that “in the light of the absence of any further risks from the uses of DINP and DIDP, the evaluation of potential substitutes has been less pertinent."

“The safety and optimal performance of plasticisers is essential for the numerous durable flexible PVC articles being used by millions of Europeans every day. The European Council for Plasticisers and Intermediates (ECPI) is confident the Commission’s communication will provide reassurance to consumers as well as a stable regulatory environment for companies to continue using these two high phthalates” stated ECPI’s manager, Dr Stéphane Content.

“Furthermore, DINP and DIDP have proved to be reliable substitutes for the classified low phthalates which are currently undergoing Reach Authorisation” he added.

Regarding children, ECHA concluded that “no further risk management measures are needed to reduce the exposure of children to DINP and DIDP”. In the case of adults, the bio-monitoring data reviewed by ECHA confirmed that “exposure from food and the indoor environment are not very significant” and, in the case of dermal exposure to DINP and DIDP is “not expected to result in a risk for adults or the developing foetus in pregnant women”.

ECHA also indicated that using sex toys containing DINP and DIDP “would not result in any risk”. Overall, the European Chemicals Agency concluded that “no further risk management measures are needed to reduce the exposure of adults to DINP and DIDP.”