Friction can turn medical products into failures

By Frank Esposito
Senior Staff Reporter

Published: June 4, 2014 4:37 pm ET
Updated: June 4, 2014 4:42 pm ET

Image By: Janet Century Ben Gerjets, left, and Josh Blackmore, both of RTP Co., speak about the importance of low friction plastics in medical devices.

Related to this story

Topics Medical, Materials, Plastics in Medical Devices
Companies & Associations RTP Co.

CLEVELAND — Researchers at RTP Co. are working to make sure friction doesn’t burn up users of single-use drug delivery devices.

The use of such devices — including syringes and injection pens — is becoming more widespread as patients are being taught how to administer their own medication, often at home. This, in turn, has put pressure on medical device makers to ensure that parts don’t exhibit stick/slip — basically, that they don’t get stuck — when being used.

“If the device doesn’t deliver the full amount of the drug, it’s a failure,” RTP global healthcare manager Josh Blackmore said May 6 at Plastics in Medical Devices, a conference hosted by Plastics News in Cleveland.

To find the best way to eliminate friction in these devices, researchers with Winona, Minn.-based RTP — which ranks among North America’s 30 largest compounders and concentrate makers — tested numerous resin pairings combined with several different lubricants.

Parts made of varying plastics — including polycarbonate, acetal, PBT, high density polyethylene, ABS and PC/ABS — were tested against each other after being filled with internal lubricants, according to product development engineer Ben Gerjets.

Lubricants used in the testing included fluorinated PFPE and RTP’s own APWA (all-polymeric wear alloy) Plus-brand lubricant. APWA Plus was commercialized earlier this year in acetal-based compounds.

RTP’s tests also measured how various plastic parts exposed to friction were affected by sterilization, UV degradation and shelf life. Parts also were exposed to 100 hours of wear over time.

“Dissimilar pairs [of resin] showed improved low friction,” Gerjets said. “But they performed best when dissimilar pairs were combined with internal lubricants.”

“Internal plastic lubrication improved stick/slip,” he added.


Comments

Friction can turn medical products into failures

By Frank Esposito
Senior Staff Reporter

Published: June 4, 2014 4:37 pm ET
Updated: June 4, 2014 4:42 pm ET

Post Your Comments


Back to story


More stories

Image

Dow reaches agreement with Third Point

November 21, 2014 9:11 am ET

Dow Chemical Co. has reached an agreement with the investment firm that has been trying to force the company to sell off some assets.More

Image

Ineos making its UK shale play

November 21, 2014 9:29 am ET

Chemical giant Ineos Group AG is planning to be the biggest player in the United Kingdom's shale gas industry.    More

Image

Total to buy majority stake in Polyblend

November 20, 2014 10:04 am ET

French oil and gas giant Total SA will buy a 68 percent stake in Germany's Polyblend GmbH, a subsidiary of Polymer-Chemie GmbH.    More

Image

Molder Carclo expands in China, chasing medical growth

November 19, 2014 3:44 pm ET

U.K.-based injection molder Carclo plc is “significantly” expanding its Chinese medical manufacturing capacity with a new factory, as the ...    More

Image

Silica can replace plastic microbeads

November 19, 2014 6:00 am ET

As cosmetics and soap makers face pressure to remove plastic microbeads from their products, Evonik Industries touts its new silica-based microbeads a...    More

Market Reports

Plastics in Brazil - State of the Industry Report

This in-depth report examines the Brazilian plastics industry from a historical and geographical context. Our analysts provide insight on economic trends and forecasts, growing manufacturing sectors that utilize plastics, private investment opportunities, market environment challenges, and innovations in R&D.

Data tables and charts on producer prices, trade, plastics production and end market indicators is also included.

Learn more

Plastics Recycling Trends in North America

This report is a review and analysis of the North American Plastics Recycling Industry, including key trends and statistics based on 2013 performance. We examine market environment factors, regulatory issues, industry challenges, key drivers and emerging trends in post-consumer and post-industrial recycling.

Learn more

Injection Molders Market Report & Ranking 2014

This special package contains our 132-page 2014 Market Report on the Injection Molding segment and our exclusive 2014 RANKINGS database of 500+ Injection Molders for a discounted package price.

Learn more

Upcoming Plastics News Events

January 14, 2015 - January 14, 2015Plastics in Automotive

February 4, 2015 - February 6, 2015Plastics News Executive Forum 2015

June 2, 2015 - June 3, 2015Plastics Financial Summit - Chicago 2015

September 16, 2015 - September 18, 2015Plastics Caps & Closures - September 2015

October 27, 2015 - October 29, 2015Plastics Financial Summit - New York - 2015

More Events