Johnson Controls experiments with color-changing materials, 3-D printing

David Sedgwick
AUTOMOTIVE NEWS

Published: August 7, 2014 9:47 am ET
Updated: August 7, 2014 9:51 am ET

Image By: Johnson Controls Inc. Johnson Controls Inc.'s "Bespoke" concept interior includes a storage unit that can be adjusted to suit individual needs.

Related to this story

Topics Automotive
Companies & Associations Johnson Controls Inc.

TRAVERSE CITY, MICH. — Color-changing panels, 3-D printed doors and redesigned storage solutions are a part of Johnson Controls Inc.’s vision for the future of automotive interiors.

The company is experimenting with swapping static plastic surfaces for “smart” surfaces that can perform additional functions.

“Our vision is that every ‘dumb’ plastic surface will become ‘smart’ in some form or shape,” Han Hendriks, vice president of advanced product development at JCI, said Aug. 6 at the Center for Automotive Research’s Management Briefing Seminars.

Future interior panels may have heating or cooling functions, or be self-cleaning surfaces. The company’s research team is also experimenting with car interior surfaces that could change colors to match the motorist’s whim.

The concept could prove especially useful for vehicles that are used by ride-sharing services, Hendriks said.

“What you really want is when you enter a car, is that it turns into your environment. So that you are able to create the specifics of the interior that you want to have, even if it’s not your car, but you enter it and the colors of the interior start to adapt to what you’ve programmed,” he said.

Hendriks’ product research team conducts its work primarily in three technical centers located in Dusseldorf, Shanghai and Holland, Mich. The team is part of JCI’s newly formed $7.5 billion-a-year joint venture with Yanfeng Automotive Trim Systems Co. Johnson Controls will have a 30 percent share in that partnership, which will market instrument panels, door panels and other interior components.

While color-changing interior surfaces could be classified as “what-if” technologies, Hendriks’ unit is engaged in more immediate research. For example, Hendriks is sorting out the preferences of China’s growing cadre of luxury car owners.

A couple of examples: Chinese motorists prefer to have storage bins designed to hold specific accessories, such as a smart phone or sun glasses — rather than general purpose bins.

Another example: older Chinese luxury car owners prefer to be chauffeured, so automakers cater to them with extended-wheelbase sedans with a lavish rear compartment.

But younger motorists — born in the 1980s or later — prefer to drive themselves, Hendriks noted. So Hendriks expects younger buyers will have preferences more closely aligned with their peers in Europe and North America.

On the manufacturing side, Hendriks sees value in the potential of additive manufacturing, or 3-D printing, to reduce waste and streamline production for complex assembled parts.

“What we should do is take a door panel with 11 different materials, 20 different components, produced in different parts of the country, being brought together and assembled in this one plant, with a lot of tools, with a lot of equipment, with a lot of process steps. Now turn this into a situation where you have one printer printing those twelve different materials, those twenty different components, assembled all at once,” he said.

In some cases the constraints placed on parts by traditional manufacturing methods — a part has to be a certain thickness so it won’t break coming out of a mold, for example — can be eliminated entirely with 3-D printing.

“You start to design for 3-D printing, and if you then project the cost of the assembled part with the current process today, it starts to become competitive at some point in the future,” Hendriks said. “It’s a very exciting technology.”

Plastics News staff reporter Kerri Jansen contributed to this report.


Comments

Johnson Controls experiments with color-changing materials, 3-D printing

David Sedgwick
AUTOMOTIVE NEWS

Published: August 7, 2014 9:47 am ET
Updated: August 7, 2014 9:51 am ET

Post Your Comments


Back to story


More stories

Image

Jaguar Land Rover to begin using MuCell across its product line

April 27, 2015 9:47 am ET

Another automaker has announced plans to use Trexel Inc.'s MuCell molding technology in future production.    More

Image

Haitian builds system for Renault's new China auto assembly plant

April 24, 2015 11:10 am ET

A late-comer to the world's largest auto market, French carmaker Renault SA is currently building its first factory in China.    More

Image

Eriks NV buys two US polymer companies

April 24, 2015 10:38 am ET

Dutch company Eriks NV is expanding its reach in the North American plastics sector with two acquisitions: Dallas-based Seals and Packings Inc. and...    More

Image

Jeco adds Ferry rotational molder to handle increase in business

April 23, 2015 12:27 pm ET

Jeco Plastics Products LLC is ramping up for more work, adding a new Ferry 2600 rotational molder that will provide more capabilities.    More

Image

Engel, VW working on joint research into high volume composites in auto

April 23, 2015 9:40 am ET

Engel, the Austria-based manufacturer of injection molding machines, is building one of its largest machines for a research center looking into integr...    More

Market Reports

North American Thermoformed Packaging Market Outlook & Review 2015

Our annual report provides a thorough review and analysis of economic and political conditions, emerging market trends, packaging design advances, materials pricing and sustainable packaging issues impacting supply and demand in the TP segment. Our analysts identify key drivers of growth and opportunities for processors to remain competitive in the years ahead through innovation, production efficiencies and more.

Learn more

Plastics Recycling Trends in North America

This report is a review and analysis of the North American Plastics Recycling Industry, including key trends and statistics based on 2013 performance. We examine market environment factors, regulatory issues, industry challenges, key drivers and emerging trends in post-consumer and post-industrial recycling.

Learn more

Plastics Caps & Closures Market Report

The annual recap of top trends and future outlook for the plastics caps & closures market features interviews with industry thought leaders and Bill Wood’s economic forecast of trends in growing end markets. You will also gain insight on trends in caps design, materials, machinery, molds & tooling and reviews of mergers & acquisitions.

Learn more

Upcoming Plastics News Events

June 2, 2015 - June 3, 2015Plastics Financial Summit - Chicago 2015

September 15, 2015 - September 17, 2015Plastics Caps & Closures - September 2015

More Events